LCS Civil Enforcement Debt Recovery & Solicitors

LCS Civil Enforcement collects debts that are owed to businesses, organisations and individuals, including EE, gas and electricity companies, 02, payday loans companies and Virgin Media. LCS also collects debts related to parking tickets and council tax, as well as various credit card companies.

Are you being chased by LCS? We can help ⬇

Why is LCS Civil Enforcement chasing me?

If LSC Civil Enforcement is attempting to make contact with you, you probably owe money to a creditor.

Is LCS Civil Enforcement a legitimate debt collector?

If LSC Civil Enforcement is attempting to make contact with you, you probably owe money to a creditor.

Who does LCS Civil Enforcement collect for?

LCS Civil Enforcement collects debts that are owed to businesses, organisations and individuals, including EE, gas and electricity companies, 02, payday loans companies and Virgin Media. LCS also collects debts related to parking tickets and council tax, as well as various credit card companies.

Should I ignore LCS Civil Enforcement’s letters or calls?

No. LCS Civil Enforcement works in accordance with a code of conduct that means they are obliged to give you time to explore the debt management options available to you. If you fail to communicate your actions to them, they will have no way of knowing that you are taking tangible steps to repay your debt.

Can I stop LCS Civil Enforcement from contacting me?

Ignoring communications from LCS will not make them stop. Instead, you should respond to their letters and take active steps to repay your debt, set up a payment plan, or explore your debt management options.

Is my debt to LCS Civil Enforcement debt statute-barred?

The 1980 Limitation Act states that some debts do have a time limit attached to them. In most cases in England, the time limit is six years, which starts from the last time you acknowledged your debt in writing or made a payment.

For your debt to be statute-barred, the following must apply to your case:

• The creditor has not opted to register a CCJ against you
• You haven’t made a payment in the last six years
• You haven’t acknowledged your debt in writing in the last six years.

Assuming all the above criteria are met, the debt cannot be enforced by law. If you believe your debt is statute-barred but you are still being chased by LCS, you should seek further advice.

I owe the debt and I can afford to pay LCS Civil Enforcement. Should I?

If LCS can prove that you are liable for the debt and you have the means to do so, it might be beneficial for you to pay the monies owed as quickly as possible. Before paying anything, however, it is important to fully consider your options to ensure that you are taking the right actions for your unique circumstances.

I can’t afford to pay LCS Civil Enforcement. What now?

If the debt is yours and is not time-barred but you cannot afford to pay it, there are several options available to you. Maintaining open channels of communication with LCS may result in the establishment of a payment plan.

If you cannot agree on a payment plan, you should explore your debt management options. These can include a Minimal Asset Process, Debt Consolidation Loan and Bankruptcy. These services will help you to obtain the advice you need via phone or an intelligent integrated AI chatbot.

Can I write off my LCS Civil Enforcement debts?

Depending on the type of debt you owe, you might be eligible to have the sum written off by obtaining an Individual Voluntary Arrangement (IVA.) IVAs can only be used if your debts are unsecured (which might include benefit overpayments, credit cards, council tax debt, store cards or overdrafts) and total more than £5,000.

To qualify you must also be able to demonstrate that you can afford to pay at a minimum of £90 each month towards the repayment of your debt. Importantly, you will still qualify if you meet the above criteria but some of your debts are owed to a different creditor.

What action can LCS Civil Enforcement take?

LCS Civil Enforcement has the same legal powers as your original creditor. LCS can chase you for payment of your debt, but they are not permitted to contact you during unsociable hours, use aggressive tactics, or harass you.

If you communicate to them that you only wish to be contacted in a particular way, they must abide by your wishes. This means that you can request for all communications to be conducted via letter or during standard working hours.

If you fail to pay your debt, LCS is permitted to send field agents to your property but they’re not bailiffs and cannot enter without your permission. However, LCS can attempt to send bailiffs to recover goods to cover your debt, issue a County Court Judgement (CCJ) against you, and/or apply for a charging order or an attachment of earnings order. To do this, however, they must first take you to court.

Could my LCS Civil Enforcement debts mean that I lose my home?

As there are several processes that need to be completed first, it is unlikely that you will lose your home. LCS Civil Enforcement primarily deals with unsecured debts, however, if you fall behind with your repayments the agency could opt to apply to the courts to have your debt secured against your property. This process is done using something called a Charging Order but for this to take effect, LCS will also need to successfully apply for a CCJ against you.

How do I make a complaint about LCS Civil Enforcement?

You can complain directly to LCS in several ways:

Post: 13 Greenland Crescent, Middlesex
Phone: 0781 882 0366

If the outcome of your complaint is not to your satisfaction, you can escalate it to the CSA or FCA.

Who is LCS debt recovery?

LCS is a debt collection agency that collects payments on behalf of a variety of creditors, businesses and individuals.

Do LCS work for HMRC?

Yes. LCS Civil Enforcement collects tax credit overpayments and unpaid tax on behalf of HMRC.

Does LCS affect credit?

Missed payments and unpaid debts can negatively affect your credit score, which can impact your ability to obtain further credit.

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